got 2 new fun audiophile bits!

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Bonedust

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first, i picked up a McCormack DNA-2 amp. I've been running Krell religiously for years. A friend of mine bought the DNA-2 and then decided he wanted to get a DNA-2 Limited Edition (im not sure why?). he kept telling me to trythis amp, it would my my Krells sound like toys. S o i took it home and treid it on the panel sections of my Statements. :eek: I was floored. After running thru about 10 tracks on the Krell and the switching to the DNA-2, and then back to the Krell...i was just amazed. The difference in presence and soundstage was quite staggering. If anyone out there is looking for amp suggestions, I HIGHLY recommend the McCormacks!

second, i picked up some vibration isolation bitsfrom this guy http://herbiesaudiolab.home.att.net . They are simple rubber blocks, but thevibration reduction was amazing. I put them under 2 of my amps, my pre-amp, and DVD-5900. After doing the water glass vibration test i was sold. I have spent big bucks in the past on equipment spikes, and these simple and cost effective rubber blocks blew them away. It just goes to show ya....pays to research.
 

DTB300

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Bonedust said:
second, i picked up some vibration isolation bitsfrom this guy http://herbiesaudiolab.home.att.net . They are simple rubber blocks, but thevibration reduction was amazing. I put them under 2 of my amps, my pre-amp, and DVD-5900. After doing the water glass vibration test i was sold. I have spent big bucks in the past on equipment spikes, and these simple and cost effective rubber blocks blew them away. It just goes to show ya....pays to research.
Herbie's makes some great stuff for a very resonable cost. If you play digital, try out his Grunge Buster CD Mat. Smoothes out the high end taking away some of that digitis...

Jeff Z has used the ball cups and balls if I am not mistaken with great success too.

Dan
 

Muad'Dib

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Bonedust said:
second, i picked up some vibration isolation bitsfrom this guy http://herbiesaudiolab.home.att.net . They are simple rubber blocks, but thevibration reduction was amazing. I put them under 2 of my amps, my pre-amp, and DVD-5900. After doing the water glass vibration test i was sold. I have spent big bucks in the past on equipment spikes, and these simple and cost effective rubber blocks blew them away. It just goes to show ya....pays to research.
Doesn't make sense to me, but I'm not going to pull "a Kevin" and argue the point to death. :D What type of rubber is it?

But I am curious if you've ever tried rubber "feet"ish things on the bottom of your speakers instead of the spikes that I assume ML provides with the speakers you've got. Especially if you seem to notice such a big difference between the rubber feet vs. spikes on your gear. Just a thought.

-D
 

DTB300

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Muad'Dib said:
Doesn't make sense to me
Yeah same thing here when I saw the CD mat. I thought "what is this little thing going to do to improve my sound?" But after testing with and without, I like the mat and the results it gives me for the price I paid.

Good thing about the products, is they offer a 90 day return if you do not like it. Here is from the site on the feet isolators: "90-day money-back trial period. Lifetime Warranty!"

Dan
 
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Bonedust

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Muad'Dib said:
Doesn't make sense to me, but I'm not going to pull "a Kevin" and argue the point to death. :D What type of rubber is it?

But I am curious if you've ever tried rubber "feet"ish things on the bottom of your speakers instead of the spikes that I assume ML provides with the speakers you've got. Especially if you seem to notice such a big difference between the rubber feet vs. spikes on your gear. Just a thought.

-D
id didnt make sense to me either, thats why i ordered the stuff and gave it a try. i cant say id pull the spikes from my speakers and switch to the isolation blocks, but for front end components and amps i thought id give it a try.

the rubber is clear and very plyable, but not at all sticky. at first the blocks seem like they wouldnt be very tough, but i put one thru a good torture test and it came out perfect.

the way i always test vibration isolation is this: get a clear glass, fill it 1/2 full of water, set it on the component, and play test tones. with my amps skiked i got a small bit of ripple in the glass...much less than on the factory feet. but it was still there. on herbies blocks, the ripple was almost gone. in fact, the little ripple that did exsist i believe came from the resonation of the glass itself.

after these tests, i may infact, try these on my speakers and see what happens.
 

risabet

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Muad'Dib said:
Doesn't make sense to me, but I'm not going to pull "a Kevin" and argue the point to death. :D What type of rubber is it?

But I am curious if you've ever tried rubber "feet"ish things on the bottom of your speakers instead of the spikes that I assume ML provides with the speakers you've got. Especially if you seem to notice such a big difference between the rubber feet vs. spikes on your gear. Just a thought.

-D
The metal cones and viscoelastic dampers like this work on different principals, cones work as a mechanical diode, unidirectionally transmitting vibration from the speaker to the floor, the vibration then being absorbed by the mass of the floor. Cones or spikes <b>DO NOT</b> decouple the speaker from the floor. Dampers prevent vibration from passing through a rack, for instance, into a component. Dampers such as these <B>ELASTICALLY DECOUPLE</B> the component. Fundamentally different solutions to different problems.
 
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Muad'Dib

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risabet said:
The metal cones and viscoelastic dampers like this work on different principals, cones work as a mechanical diode, unidirectionally transmitting vibration from the speaker to the floor, the vibration then being absorbed by the mass of the floor. Cones or spikes <b>DO NOT</b> decouple the speaker from the floor. Dampers prevent vibration from passing through a rack, for instance, into a component. Dampers such as these <B>ELASTICALLY DECOUPLE</B> the component. Fundamentally different solutions to different problems.
Interesting. Thanks.

-D
 
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