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How do you dust the interior of an Amplifier?

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Robin

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I was dusting the exterior of my amplifiers and processor, when I noticed, I could clearly see through the cooling grid housing of my amplifier. I could see inside all of the electronics, cooling fins, transformers etc. inside and noticed some dust has already accumulated on the interior electronics fins etc. It was like looking through a 'Bar-B Q' grill at the coal underneath. My dusting across the top of the housing grid with a cloth, unfortunately pushed / spilled dust down the vent openings into the inside. I immediately switched to a hand held vacuum cleaner. But it is gnawing at me that over time dust will keep accumulating on the interior components and that can't be good for cooling, the electronics or the amplifier or processor components in general. I know that all audio / electronic gear and speakers attracts dust like a magnet. I also know that an air purifier helps too.

My questions are: How do you clean the inside of the amplifier or processor? Do you just unplug the unit, then unscrew the housing cover and use a hand held air pressure cleaning wand. Like the one I use to clean dust from my computer key board? Or do I use small hand held vacuum cleaner? Do I use a special dust collecting style cloth? Or do I use all of the above? I've taken my computer tower housing off and dusted the inside of it, using a regular cotton cloth and a hand held vacuum cleaner to remove dust before. Is it the same kind of process? or different or more involved? What cleaning equipment do I need?

Also, how often do you clean the inside of a amplifier or processor? Once a year or once every three years? I guess it may depend on how much dust in the environment in general, how many air purifiers in use, household pets etc.?

If any one could give me some advice or direction in this matter, I would appreciate the assistance... :eek:

Cheers

-Robin
 

roberto

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Robin said:
I was dusting the exterior of my amplifiers and processor, when I noticed, I could clearly see through the cooling grid housing of my amplifier. I could see inside all of the electronics, cooling fins, transformers etc. inside and noticed some dust has already accumulated on the interior electronics fins etc. It was like looking through a 'Bar-B Q' grill at the coal underneath. My dusting across the top of the housing grid with a cloth, unfortunately pushed / spilled dust down the vent openings into the inside. I immediately switched to a hand held vacuum cleaner. But it is gnawing at me that over time dust will keep accumulating on the interior components and that can't be good for cooling, the electronics or the amplifier or processor components in general. I know that all audio / electronic gear and speakers attracts dust like a magnet. I also know that an air purifier helps too.

My questions are: How do you clean the inside of the amplifier or processor? Do you just unplug the unit, then unscrew the housing cover and use a hand held air pressure cleaning wand. Like the one I use to clean dust from my computer key board? Or do I use small hand held vacuum cleaner? Do I use a special dust collecting style cloth? Or do I use all of the above? I've taken my computer tower housing off and dusted the inside of it, using a regular cotton cloth and a hand held vacuum cleaner to remove dust before. Is it the same kind of process? or different or more involved? What cleaning equipment do I need?

Also, how often do you clean the inside of a amplifier or processor? Once a year or once every three years? I guess it may depend on how much dust in the environment in general, how many air purifiers in use, household pets etc.?

If any one could give me some advice or direction in this matter, I would appreciate the assistance... :eek:

Cheers

-Robin
Hola Robin. What I do is:
1) Unplugg the component from the Mains A.C. Wait at least 30 minutes before start the cleaning, this is, because some capacitors might be charged.
2) Take it to a table or bench.
3) Take the cover off. Usually you find phillips NO.2 tip. screws.
4) With the help of a brush and the vacuum cleaner, sweep all the components, taking care of some fragil components that might be inside, like tubes. The other components are capable to stand a brush.
5) Put the cover back
You are done! Happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
 

Craig

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I don't think I would use a vacuum cleaner to clean any electrical component, especially one with a circuit board. It's very possible that the air moving through the vacuum cleaner will generate a charge of static electricity that could damage sensitive electronics. This is more likely to happen in dry climates.

If you use a vacuum then you should at least ground the vacuum cleaner to the component you are cleaning. Doing so should help prevent your component from getting zapped.

I think it is safer to use compressed air to blow it all out after removing the cover.
 

Robin

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Amplifier / Processor Interior Dusting and Cleaning...

roberto said:
Hola Robin. What I do is:
1) Unplugg the component from the Mains A.C. Wait at least 30 minutes before start the cleaning, this is, because some capacitors might be charged.
2) Take it to a table or bench.
3) Take the cover off. Usually you find phillips NO.2 tip. screws.
4) With the help of a brush and the vacuum cleaner, sweep all the components, taking care of some fragil components that might be inside, like tubes. The other components are capable to stand a brush.
5) Put the cover back
You are done! Happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
Roberto and Craig,

Thank you for the information & advice... :D
How often do you normally / routinely service (Dust & Clean the Interior) your Amplifier / Processor? Yearly? :confused:

Cheers

-Robin
 

roberto

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Craig said:
I don't think I would use a vacuum cleaner to clean any electrical component, especially one with a circuit board. It's very possible that the air moving through the vacuum cleaner will generate a charge of static electricity that could damage sensitive electronics. This is more likely to happen in dry climates.

If you use a vacuum then you should at least ground the vacuum cleaner to the component you are cleaning. Doing so should help prevent your component from getting zapped.

I think it is safer to use compressed air to blow it all out after removing the cover.
Hola Craig...good advise...I'm still at the old type of electronics and don´t think about how new electronic components might be sensitive to static. Yes, the air compressor is the best way to go. The truth is that what I use, but I think that not everybody has one at home. Again, thanks for the advise, happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
 

Spike

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Dust remover spray from Radio Shack

These electronic cleaner/duster from Radio Shack are much more gentle on electronic components than a full-blown air compressor. I'm using these with great success, once a year.

Spike
 

roberto

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Spike said:
These electronic cleaner/duster from Radio Shack are much more gentle on electronic components than a full-blown air compressor. I'm using these with great success, once a year.

Spike
Thanks Spike. Yes, you are right also. My compressor has a special regulator preasure valve, so when I'm going to blow inside of delicate components, I use only 15 psi. Also I use an antistatic brush. It is made of carbon fibers.
Cheers,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
 

Robin

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Cleaning / Dusting annually...

Spike said:
These electronic cleaner/duster from Radio Shack are much more gentle on electronic components than a full-blown air compressor. I'm using these with great success, once a year.

Spike
Spike and Roberto,

Thanks for the wonderful advice and recommendations. So I'll plan on an annual electronic cleaning session, with an air compressor less than 15 psi and / or a cleaner/duster from Radio Shack. Roberto I wonder do you know where I could find an anti-static brush? At Radio Shack? Well, I'll check it out... :) You guy have been a great help.

Thanks again,

Cheers

-Robin
 

roberto

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Robin said:
Spike and Roberto,

Thanks for the wonderful advice and recommendations. So I'll plan on an annual electronic cleaning session, with an air compressor less than 15 psi and / or a cleaner/duster from Radio Shack. Roberto I wonder do you know where I could find an anti-static brush? At Radio Shack? Well, I'll check it out... :) You guy have been a great help.

Thanks again, Cheers

-Robin
Hola Robin. I got mine here in Costa Rica, but there you have a lot of choices where to get one...here is an address:

http://www.nextag.com/serv/main/buy...&nxtg=1e130a20050a-CADBC1A00C4FA7D4&_rk=32542

You can use it without problem...hope this can help, and happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
 

Robin

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Anit-static brush...

roberto said:
Hola Robin. I got mine here in Costa Rica, but there you have a lot of choices where to get one...here is an address:

http://www.nextag.com/serv/main/buy...&nxtg=1e130a20050a-CADBC1A00C4FA7D4&_rk=32542

You can use it without problem...hope this can help, and happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
Roberto,

Thank you so much for the additional information, it has really assisted me in this interior electronic's cleaning / dusting project... :D :D

Cheers

-Robin
 

SugarMedia

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After reading this thread I went out and bought a can of, "Dust be gone damnit" and then I realised it has a rating of 16.5 psi. should I be worried?

Troubled at home,



SM.
 

roberto

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SugarMedia said:
After reading this thread I went out and bought a can of, "Dust be gone damnit" and then I realised it has a rating of 16.5 psi. should I be worried?

Troubled at home,



SM.
Hhola sugarmedio. No problem...happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto. :D
 

SugarMedia

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roberto said:
Hhola sugarmedio. No problem...happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto. :D
Roberto, I had one too many martini's in me last night and I was only joking about that.
 

roberto

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SugarMedia said:
Roberto, I had one too many martini's in me last night and I was only joking about that.
Hola Sugarmedia...I knew you were, but I thought that you deserved a reply...with all respect!!!...Normally the preasure at any air compressor is between 110 ips for full charge and 80 to start the motor. This preasure is too strong for delicated electronic devices, so the need of a preasure regulator valve is a must. I knew you were joking, specially due to your replies in other threads, you are fine Sugarmedia. :D :D.
Regarding with your response, believe it or not, I have had many customers that actually, with your question, until they will find that there will be no problem, then they will use it...you have read a lot of questions even here at the forum, close to that also. So, please keep up your sense of humor, we need that here also!!! Happy listening,
Pura vida,
Roberto.
 
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