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Thread: who needs new panels when you use conducitve liquid

  1. #1
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    Default who needs new panels when you use conducitve liquid

    i would just like to share and help any one who has a low out put from there panel ,or any one who wants to coat there speakers with conductive liquid
    what you do is with a a sharp knife cut away the glue top and bottom sticky stuff be very careful. when it is open clean the panels with distiled water, let it dry then coat the speaker, should you wish you will be amazed how much muck comes off the panels i will take a pick when i do my next speaker
    Last edited by madkebab; 06-17-2010 at 06:02 AM.
     

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    Super User User211's Avatar
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    Some pics would be great. Good thread. But what people really need to know is the outcome... sonically. Should be pretty good, I expect.

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    Super User C.A.P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madkebab View Post
    i would just like to share and help any one who has a low out put from there panel ,or any one who wants to coat there speakers with conductive liquid
    what you do is with a a sharp knife cut away the glue top and bottom sticky stuff be very careful. when it is open clean the panels with distiled water, let it dry then coat the speaker, should you wish you will be amazed how much muck comes off the panels i will take a pick when i do my next speaker
    HMMMMMMMM ..

    Liquid and High Voltage ???? DO SHARE !
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    Member Dominick22's Avatar
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    I am very interested to see this diy project.
    My Ascent panels are about 5 years old and are working great-but I need to do a panel cleaning in the next few years.

    Dominick

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    Super User JonFo's Avatar
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    Sounds interesting, but I'm skeptical. Here's why:

    I've disassembled both SL3 and Monolith panels. Neither are easy, and the Monoliths were a total, absolute bitch to separate.

    The risks associated with the procedure described are:
    • ripping the mylar. Trust me, very, very easy to do.
    • hours removing old gummy glues from stators and mylar
    • must preserve spars (the horizontal separators between diaphragm and stators)

    Even if you manage to separate the stators from the mylar, clean and re-coat the mylar, you still have the HUGE challenge of re-installing the mylar with the correct tension on the stators. This would seem to me to be the real deal-killer here. I've seen how a new panel is put together at the factory, no way any DIY is going to get even close to those results.

    Given the relative costs of replacement panels (in the US at least), your time has to be really low-value before this approach even begins to make sense.

    Plus new panels come with new spars, and on the smaller panels, these are new clear-spars, which look much better.
    Jonathan

    System #45 (Monolith IIIx, Sequell IIb, SL3XC)

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    Junior Member pidigi's Avatar
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    Hi Jonathan


    Quote Originally Posted by JonFo View Post



    Even if you manage to separate the stators from the mylar, clean and re-coat the mylar, you still have the HUGE challenge of re-installing the mylar with the correct tension on the stators. This would seem to me to be the real deal-killer here. I've seen how a new panel is put together at the factory, no way any DIY is going to get even close to those results.
    I'm very curious to know how they tension the mylar on the stators. I already did a "stretch table" for the mylar for flat panels, but of course the curved are different beasts!

    Given the relative costs of replacement panels (in the US at least), your time has to be really low-value before this approach even begins to make sense.
    The last quotation for replacement panels for my Monoliths here in Italy (in 2007) was 1300 euro. If I'm going to spend 300 euro for the parts needed to restore the panels I would have a 1000 euro to compensate for the time spent ;-)
    But yes, you are right, the price in U.S. is much lower: at that time (2007) the cost in U.S. was 900$. With the exchange rate we have now means half the price paid in Italy....

    Ciao!

    Paolo

  7. #7
    Newbie TubeHeaven's Avatar
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    By "conductive coating" what are you using? There's a ton of different ones. A commonly available one that many DIY's use is Licron Crystal from here: http://www.alliedelec.com/search/pro...x?SKU=70207106

    I agree DIY is much more economical and not difficult if you can separate the stators
    Sources - Theta Pearl CD transport, Parasound tuner, Oracle Alexandria turntable w/ Grace F-8/SAE 1000E
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    Is this the Licron Crystal in question??
    http://www.intertronics.co.uk/products/ctec1755.htm

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    Hi all,just going down this path myself.the stretch table will be made from wood ,say two, two inch by two inch lengths with a flat piece of wood screwed to each end ,about one inch thick.
    The trick is to cut them following the curved shape of your panel, then sandpaper the top so there is no rough edges for the mylar to snag on.
    So that is your stretch table,you then get a small , cheap spring scale cut a small ally/ steel tag large enough to be able to stick your gaffa tape{must not stretch lengthwise so you get the correct tension} then attach to the spring scale.put your mylar sheet over the length of your table and tape loose at one end .
    So now tape the scale and put the other end in the middle of your mylar , and at the top of the curve tension to 2.5 pounds do the same at each end.then repeat on either side of the original stretch and at each end.
    Make sure when making the table to follow the curve you have cut so that when the stat panel is placed under it ,that the curve extends further than the panel edges this will help sorting out any crinkles. Now place your panel under the stretch table on some books ,so you can lower the s/table over your panel.as for the side tension stand over the stretch table and doing both sides at the same time,pull the mylar out so it is straight and stick it down onto the double sided tape on your panel making sure that the top of the panel is all nice and straight .so thats it in a rough sort of manner.

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